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Hey! As many of you will have seen, we recently took a trip (well, back in March) to Ireland. We had a great time, but also took some time to capture some film footage. We’ve put it together here in this short piece. We hope you all enjoy!

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Have a great week!

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Hi everyone. It is raining outside on this Easter Monday. A soft summer rain, turning the nature very green now.

I was walking to the trainstation on Argentinierstrasse in Vienna, admiring the nature around me, looking at large trees hanging over me when I turned and saw this:

On the other side of the street; these eyes watching. A series of art, one oil painting and two other collages.

I was fascinated by the messages: “Poverty and opulence” and “Self control.” Thoughts to consider on an Easter Monday.

I found myself at the Landesmuseum in Linz on Tuesday, and since it was the middle of the day, the museum was empty. It was rather surreal to walk around completely alone in the large, open spaces. It was as if the exhibit was created just for me.

Mette Tronvoll, a Norwegian photographer, studied in New York and now lives in Oslo. Her exhibit at the Landesmusem was a treat.

Portraits are the cornerstone of Tronvoll’s artistic practice it seems, portraying friends and acquaintances, or people from different groups or cultures. The portraits are usually produced in a series that reveal tensions between individuals or types, and what I realized was that they speak loudly about similarities and differences.

In the series Couples, Tronvoll portrays friends with their partners. The way the couples position themselves, their individual expressions dominate the mood in each picture. The almost life-size format brought me close to each subject.

Tronvoll has also traveled extensively, and I loved the portraits and people from various rural parts of the world, such as Mongolia. I was particularly fascinated by the portraits of soldiers in the series Rena. The camouflage and the uniforms counteract individual characteristics and the only thing that makes it personal is the subject’s gaze.

I was inspired by the captured moments in the photographs. I hope that each of you are inspired by life’s treasures too.

Yesterday, I spent a great day in the city of Linz. After walking around for most of day in very cold April weather (one of those days), I tagged along with my friend to the OK Kulturhaus in the city center for the opening of the six-day long film festival Crossing Europe.

Press accreditation and information room for guests

Most Austrians are familiar with the annual film festival Viennale. It draws a public from all around the world and goes on for one month. A smaller version of the Viennale, and perhaps a bit less known, is Crossing Europe.

(sponsored by Silhouette)

This year is the festival’s eighth year, but the genre stays the same, devoted to idiosyncratic, contemporary and socio-political auteur cinema from Europe.

Guests of the film industry (nearly 600 accredited festival participants) and the local cinema audience are able to choose from a program with 130 hand-picked films, documentaries and short films.

Linz views

The opening night was filled to the brim with the press, photographers and other guests, being welcomed to the program, the jury and the guest of honor, Austrian film producer gone Hollywood, Eric Pleskow. He is the former president of United Artists and Orion Pictures, and during the hight of his career the film One flew over the Cuckoo’s nest (1976) under the ownership of United Artists, won an Oscar.

Eric Pleskow (sitting) is greeted by a very (and I mean very) excited event organizer

Before the first screening of the festival, the co-organizer OK Kulturhaus invited guests to enjoy the traditional Austrian meal knödel and sauerkraut and a cold beer to splash it down.

I would have started with a witty recount of how the two photographers met – I’ve heard it was in Britain, but that’s as far as I can expound. So I’ll tell you what I do know. World renowned British photographer, Martin Parr, has joined Lithuanian photographer Rimaldas Viksraitis, to produce a splendid collection of hyper-real – teetering on absurd – photographs.

A man and woman in discussion, Viksraitis’ work behind

Titled the Real World, the exhibit is on display at the Anzenberger Gallery, where we attended the vernissage. The composition of the two sets of photographs vis-à-vis one-another forms a remarkable collection; Parr’s photographs appear vibrantly colored next to Viksraitis’ high-contrast black-and-white images.

The exhibit will be showing through May, though for those who didn’t attend the opening night, both photographers have already left town.

Further reading can be found in German in the daily, Der Standard.

Hello friends, and good Thursday afternoon!

We took a short hiatus (or long weekend, depending on how you want to look at it) to Ireland on Friday night. We landed in Dublin, and from there, scoured the country for several days. Here are some teaser images.

Land and sea below

At Dublin International Airport, miniature

We’ll have a travel recap over the weekend with lots of stunning photographs! Hope everybody is getting through the week alright! See you soon!

I am loving the Sunday morning feeling of having gotten up early, and having that first cup of joe.

Yesterday afternoon I had coffee with a dear friend at Naschmarkt, who pointed out this political statement hanging over our heads, literally. It must so often go unnoticed, perhaps a lot like the continuing movements in Northern Africa. Or are they?

from Naschmarkt, Vienna, Austria

I like the composition of this photograph, the depth and story, with the two men standing in the foreground – illuminated by the sun – in discussion with statement overhead.

Always interested in your thoughts. Hope everybody is having a nice weekend!

This must symbolize something.

What do you think?

Happy Monday/V day/welcome back to work!

There’s something incredibly aesthetically pleasing about receiving mail via snail-mail! Perhaps it’s leftover nostalgia from childhood, when you went to check whether the post had delivered anything other than advertisements. And back then, often times they did.

But it doesn’t work if there’s nobody sending things… it’s a give and take situation. So I’m inclined to send a hand-written letter from time to time, just to fill that void. Valentine’s day is a good time to remind others – not only a partner – that you are thinking of them.

This is a design that I came up with a couple weeks ago.

Do you enjoy sending and receiving snail-mail? What time of the year inspires you to do so?

I just wanted to share these images with you. They are the magic of the Earth and sky, and the less beautiful side of how we’ve come to decorate the landscape.

Check out the full-size photographs here.